So…what was a late 15th-century English coin doing in the ruins of an early 17th-century English settlement in Newfoundland?

An example of a half-groat silver coin, minted at Canterbury during the reign of Henry VII from 1493 to 1499. By The Portable Antiquities Scheme/ The Trustees of the British Museum, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=54926198 There's been a bit of archaeological buzz over the recently announced discovery of probably the oldest English coin ever found... Continue Reading →

The remarkable Gribshunden find: a 1495 shipwreck revolutionizing our understanding of a critical age of sail

A detail of the Gribshunden wreck, fig. 12 in the 2021 archaeologists' report. Smithsonian Magazine this month has a feature article on the most recent underwater archaeology performed on the Gribshunden (Greyhound), a heavily-armed flagship of King Hans of Denmark that caught fire, exploded, and sank on the coast of Sweden in 1495. Despite the... Continue Reading →

“Wreckwatch”

Like history? Marine archaeology? And every point in between? Thanks to a citation in a recent article in the Guardian, I discovered this quarterly magazine, Wreckwatch. Produced in Britain, it's written by actual marine archaeologists and historians, is very readable, roams the globe in content, and is full of nerd-out imagery. Even better: it's free.... Continue Reading →

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