Academia

After a 30-year absence I returned to higher education in 2010 as a doctoral candidate in history at Canada’s York University.  In 2012 I received a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship from the federal government in support of my doctoral research, and was awarded the William E. Taylor Fellowship as the outstanding doctoral award recipient by Canada’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). In April 2015 I was awarded my PhD after successfully defending my dissertation “Stone of Power: Dighton Rock, Colonization, and the Erasure of an Indigenous Past.” I was awarded a Dissertation Prize by York University, and in 2016 I received the Distinguished Dissertation Award for Humanities, Social Sciences and Fine Arts from the Canadian Association of Graduate Studies. I held a two-year postdoctoral fellowship under Dr. Susan Roy at the University of Waterloo. A revised version of my dissertation, incorporating additional research, was published in 2017 by the University of North Carolina Press as The Place of Stone.

Conference papers and lectures

Pseudohistory and the Demarcation Problem (Canadian Historical Association 2014) HunterCHApseudohist

White Tribism, Lost Tribes, and the Multiple Migration Displacement Scenario (Sal Weaver Memorial Lecture, University of Waterloo, 2016, and Ethnohistory 2016) HunterSalWeaver2016

Yroquet’s World: Champlain, Trade, and Indigenous Deathways (Circles of Interaction Conference, 2015) DouglasHunterYroquetsWorld

You also can find samples of my academic work, including some conference papers, at Researchgate